BEING BILINGUAL AT WORK

BEING BILINGUAL AT WORK

 

JAmieblogprofilepic.jpgBy:  Jamie Perez

There are many benefits to being a bi-lingual speaker. It especially helps when you are at your workplace.  The United States of America consist of people from many countries. Spanish is the second most common language after English.  Sometimes we come across situations in which a person only speaks Spanish. What do you do? Having someone in the office that speaks Spanish is great. Our patient can communicate in their native language.  This natural communication ensures no details will be missed with the mindset of “I just did not understand!”  West Paces Ferry Orthodontics’s Spanish-speaking patients will be more comfortable.  It is also nice to have a variety in our office. Working with people of different cultures and diversities is wonderful. How do you feel when you go into an office and see a range of staff from different countries and parts of the U.S?  If you are a Spanish speaker, how do you feel when you know that there is someone in an office that speaks Spanish? We would love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

Don’t Believe Everything You Read

Don’t Believe Everything You Read

Flossing Is Important!

 

By: Kristin Huber DMDhubertitle

If the media reported there is no proof you needed to wash your hands would you believe it?  Would you never pick up a bar of soap again?  Of course not!  Recently an article was published that flossing doesn’t have any benefit. As a dental professional, this is mind-blowing. There is no doubt that the mechanical removal of plaque is essential to healthy gums. Plaque is bacteria that builds up on the teeth daily. If not removed, it will cause inflammation and infection of the surrounding tissues. Brushing alone cannot remove all the plaque. Plaque builds up in between the teeth as well, and only dental floss can remove it.

If you have any doubt of the effectiveness of flossing, take a day or two off.  When you floss again,  inspect some bacteria that has built up that you can remove with floss. Better yet, smell it!  Do you want to leave all that bacteria behind in your mouth?

The Hottest Event of the Summer!

The Hottest Event of the Summer!

By: Dr. Kristin L. Huber

As summer is winding down, Atlanta’s party scene is heating up! One of the best parties of the summer is the Summer Sizzle that benefits Children’s Healthcare Of AtlantaWest Paces Ferry Orthodontics is proud to be sponsoring this amazing event.  Dr. Huber and Dr. Yurfest have been affiliated with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta for many years.  Dr. Yurfest has been a part of the staff for over 20 years.  Dr. Huber is a member of the craniofacial and cleft palate team.  She is also active in her local FRIENDS group.  FRIENDS is the community volunteer organization of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.  They raise millions of dollars each year on behalf of Children’s Healthcare.

 

This year’s summer send-off party will take place on Friday, August 26th, 2016. The event starts at 8 p.m. and will last until 12 a.m. at the chic Summerour Studios in midtown.  Planners expect more than 400 Atlantans will attend and show their support for Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.  Guests will enjoy catering by Epting Events, summer cocktails, and music by Anita, a Motown band. There will also be an exciting silent auction, featuring rare art and travel deals.  So, put on your summer whites and we will see you there!

10 Things Parents Should Know About Invisalign Teen

10 Things Parents Should Know About Invisalign Teen

As the nation’s leading Invisalign provider, West Paces Ferry Orthodontics understands making the best choice for your teen’s dental health can be daunting with all the choices at your disposal.  Invisalign Teen is a great option for straightening your teen’s teeth and correcting an unhealthy bite.  West Paces Ferry Orthodontics, in Buckhead Georgia, qualifies 99% of teens as  Invisalign Teen patients… even if they have been told they don’t qualify at other orthodontic practices.  There are many misconceptions about Invisalign Teen so we are sharing 10 facts every parent should know, before deciding whether braces or Invisalign Teen is the best choice for their teen!

 

1. WHAT IS INVISALIGN TEEN?

 

Invisalign Teen is the virtually invisible way to straighten your teen’s teeth without the restrictions that come with metal braces. invisaligntray Rather than wires and brackets, Invisalign® uses a series of clear, removable aligners that have been custom-made for your teen’s teeth. Your teen simply wears them over their teeth and changes them out for a new set of aligners every  week. Your teen’s teeth gradually shift into place, achieving that confident smile.

 

2. IS INVISALIGN AS EFFECTIVE AS TRADITIONAL BRACES?

Yes. When worn according to the recommendations of Dr. Yurfest and Dr. Huber, Invisalign Teen is as effective as traditional braces. Invisalign can effectively treat mild to severe cases, including underbite, overbite, overcrowding and gaps between teeth. Your teen will be a great candidate for Invisalign, as 99% of Teens qualify at West Paces Ferry Orthodontics.  West Paces Ferry Orthodontics offers complimentary consultations, and is conveniently located in Buckhead Georgia.

 

3. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE PRACTICAL ADVANTAGES OF INVISALIGN TEEN OVER TRADITIONAL BRACES?

 

If you’ve had braces yourself, you already know the issues associated with metal wires and brackets – aggravated lips, food restrictions, and difficulty brushing.  With Invisalign, the aligners are removable, so your teen can play sports without the worry of being hit in the mouth by a ball, which can cause real damage in braces. softballsmall_HRThey can also continue playing musical instruments properly, without braces getting in the way. With braces, there is a long list of foods your teen shouldn’t eat, from popcorn to apples and raw carrots. With Invisalign, there are no such restrictions. The removable aligners make it easy to brush and floss normally to maintain proper oral hygiene.

 

4. ARE THERE ANY EMOTIONAL CONCERNS TO CONSIDER?

Research shows that moms underestimate the extent to which teens feel self-conscious about crooked teeth, and using braces as a solution can often make this lack of confidence even worse. But with Invisalign Teen, no one needs to know your teen is straightening their teeth, removing a potential source of real anxiety for them and giving them the confidence to be themselves in front of everyone.

 

5. WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR INVISALIGN TEEN?

As the nation’s leading Invisalign provider West Paces Ferry Orthodontics is able to qualify 99% of teens for Invisalign Teen treatment.  Invisalign can be used for teens who have erupting teeth — this includes most teenagers. Dr. Yurfest and Dr. Huber will evaluate your teen’s specific dental issues to plan the best treatment for your teen. To see a comparison of experience, log on to Invisalign – Find A Doctor .  West Paces Ferry Orthodontics is the Top provider based on experience.  Your teen will thank you for making that extra effort!

 

6. HOW LONG DOES INVISALIGN TEEN TREATMENT TAKE?

The average treatment time is about the same as with traditional braces, but the actual length of your teen’s treatment depends on the severity of their condition and can only be determined by Dr. Yurfest or Dr. HuberWest Paces Ferry Orthodontics offers multiple Accelerated Orthodontic treatments that work in conjunction with Invisalign Teen that can cut most treatment times in half!

 

7. HOW MUCH DOES INVISALIGN COST?

Invisalign Teen costs about the same as traditional braces. Check your dental insurance plan—orthodontic treatment with Invisalign Teen is covered by many dental insurance policies. West Paces Ferry Orthodontics offers flexible and affordable monthly payment plans as well as complimentary consultations.

 

8. DOES MY TEEN HAVE TO WEAR INVISALIGN ALL THE TIME?

Invisalign Teen is most effective when worn 20 to 22 hours per day. West Paces Ferry Orthodontic’s data show that teens wear their aligners on average for just under 21 hours per day, exactly as recommended and better than adults.  Plus, Invisalign Teen has a built-in assurance check; each aligner has blue indicators that fade over time when used as directed, so Dr. Yurfest & Dr. Huber can track compliance.2girls-phone_HR.jpg

9. WHAT HAPPENS IF AN ALIGNER GETS LOST?

Not to worry—Invisalign Teen offers six replacement aligners for free! In the event that an aligner is lost, you should inform a West Paces Ferry Orthodontics representative right away.

 

10. HOW MUCH TIME WILL BE SPENT VISITING THE ORTHODONTIST?

Invisalign Teen often requires less time with your orthodontist than traditional braces do. There are no adjustments to make, no broken wires to fix. After the initial appointment, follow-up appointments are usually scheduled periodically.

Request An Appointment For  a Complimentary Consultation!

Appointment Request

Parents, Learn More About Invisalign Teen.

Learn More About Invisalign and invisalign Teen

Invisalign Teen vs. Braces Treatment Comparison Chart

Invisalign Teen Compare Chart

 

 

 

Has 3D Printing Opened a Dangerous Door To Do It Yourself Orthodontics?

Has 3D Printing Opened a Dangerous Door To Do It Yourself Orthodontics?

A design major at New Jersey Institute of Technology, Amos Dudley , has designed his own clear trays and unintentionally rekindled a dangerous practice.  Dudley never intended to change the way orthodontics are done “I was also routinely asked about whether I planned to start a business creating cheap invisible aligners for people. It was obvious early on that this wouldn’t be a good idea. For one thing, I had a very simple relapsed-braces case – I don’t have the knowledge to go beyond what I did. Beyond that, there would be huge liability issues, and major logistic challenges to treating people remotely, especially since I wouldn’t have x-rays, much less the training to interpret them.  I’m a designer and a hacker, not an orthodontist – those are my passions, and I’m sticking to them.”.1 The media coverage Dudley’s accomplishment has spiked an interest in DYI orthodontic treatment and this is a dangerous trend.  A recent American Association of Orthodontist press release highlights the danger to consumers any time dental procedures are undertaken by an untrained or unsupervised individual. These dangers present substantial risk for irreparable damage.2

Other methods of do it yourself Orthodontics are found on the internet and the consequences can be dire.  As a elementary school student, David Campbell, a 47-year-old who works for a nonprofit that sends missionaries abroad, had a gap between his front teeth. A dentist advised him to use rubber bands nightly to close it. After elastics got stuck under his gums, the two front teeth started protruding; by age 13, he had lost both teeth at the root. “It was pretty traumatic,” he said.3

Capture---Dentistr_2453127a

“Do it yourself orthodontics isn’t like a home improvement project where a mistake can easily be corrected by a professional,” according to Dr. Kristin Huber of West Paces Ferry Orthodontics4,  Atlanta’s top provider of Invisalign.  “Moving teeth unsupervised can cause damage to the teeth, bone, and surrounding structures that likely cannot be reversed and could result in tooth loss.”  The best solution is to set up a consultation with an orthodontist, which is complimentary at West Paces Ferry Orthodontics.  Orthodontists receive two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school and are specialists in straightening teeth, aligning the bite safely, and  the affects on the supporting biology  once they have completed Dental School.

 

hubertitle
Dr. Kristin Huber

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

  1. http://orthopundit.com/interview-with-amos-Dudley
  2. http://aao.informz.net/admin31/content/template.asp?sid=43185&ptid=1194&brandid=3395&uid=781318262&mi=5207678&ps=4318
  3. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/01/the-hazards-of-do-it-yourself-orthodonture/?_r=0
  4. http://www.westpacesferryortho.com/meet-dr-huber
Meet Dr. Huber

Meet Dr. Huber

Doctor Kristin Lucas Huber is an Atlanta native, having graduated from The Lovett School. Dr. Huber comes from a family of dentists and always knew that she wanted to pursue a career in dentistry.

 

Huberbody
Dr. Kristin Huber, West Paces Ferry Orthodontics

 

Dr. Huber is committed to providing quality orthodontic treatment while exceeding her patients’ and their parents’ expectations with fantastic results. While she has a strong focus on clinical excellence, Dr. Huber also enjoys helping both children and adults to have a positive and fun orthodontic experience. She finds enhancing her patients’ lives with a beautiful smile to be very rewarding.

 

Education and Experience

 

After graduating from Lovett, Dr. Huber completed her undergraduate studies at Vanderbilt University. Upon graduation, Dr. Huber entered Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. There she received her Doctorate of Dental Medicine and completed her residency in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.

Dr. Huber finished at the top of her class and received several distinctions for merit and service. She was presented with The American Equilibration Society Senior Award for excellence in temporomandibular disorders as well as the prestigious American College of Dentists Award. The American College of Dentists is the oldest national honorary society for dentists. It recognizes outstanding leadership and exceptional contributions to dentistry and society.

Dr. Huber’s formal education in orthodontics has provided her with a strong foundation of knowledge and experience. By regularly participating in continuing education, she is able to stay current on the latest technology and orthodontic treatments. Continuing education allows Dr. Huber to provide her patients with more options and better results.

 

She is also a member of several professional associations that provide her with many opportunities for continuing education, including the American Association of Orthodontics, Southern Association of Orthodontics, American Dental Association, Georgia Dental Association, and the Northern District Dental Society.

Commitment to the Community

 

Working in this community has provided Dr. Huber the opportunity to meet so many wonderful people. She enjoys getting to know all her diverse patients and building relationships with them that last long after treatment is complete. Dr. Huber is on staff at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta where she provides care to children with oro-facial deformities. She also volunteers at the Ben Massell dental clinic that provides dental care for underprivileged patients in the Atlanta metro area.

Dr. Huber joined West Paces Ferry Orthodontics in the summer of 2008. She is happy to be a part of this wonderful and lively practice, where she enjoys treating both children and adults.

 

West Paces Ferry Orthodontics | Orthodontist Atlanta GA

Meet Dr. Paul Yurfest

Meet Dr. Paul Yurfest

 

Doctor Paul Yurfest has been shaping the smiles of Atlanta since 1975. He believes the patient’s satisfaction is the most important element of orthodontics. He enjoys forming a relationship with his patients and has no greater joy than making them happy with the appearance of their smile.

 

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Dr. Paul Yurfest

Education and Experience

  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology – University of Maryland, College Park
  • Doctorate of Dental Surgery – Howard University, Washington, DC
  • Internship – Boston Veteran Administration Hospital
  • Certificate Program in Orthodontics – Howard University, Washington, DC

 During his formal education, Dr. Yurfest was awarded the Louis C. Ball Fellowship for outstanding academics and the Outstanding Research Award for Jaw Orthopedics.

 In 1975, Dr. Yurfest was recruited by a professor to come to Atlanta, GA to join the practice of Dr. Marvin Goldstein, who was the world’s pioneer in adult orthodontic treatment. Today, Dr. Yurfest still practices in the same location, and he’s still a specialist in adult orthodontics and a leading provider of Invisalign®, early orthodontic treatment for children, TMJ/TMD treatment, and accelerated orthodontics.

 He has served as a clinical associate professor of orthodontics at the Medical College of Georgia and as the director of orthodontics at Ben Massell Dental Clinic.

 Professional Affiliations

  • American Dental Association
  • American Association of Orthodontists
  • American Board of Orthodontics College of Diplomates
  • Georgia Dental Association
  • Georgia Society of Orthodontics
  • International College of Dentists
  • American Lingual Orthodontics Association, Founding Chapter Member

Outside the Office

 Along with his professional achievements, Dr. Yurfest is the proud dad of three children, a grandfather to two beautiful grandchildren, a husband, and an active member of the Atlanta community, where he donates time and talent to various organizations in need of his expertise. Dr. Yurfest can be found singing, telling jokes, and having fun daily at work, a job for which he still has a passion after all these years!

West Paces Ferry Orthodontics | Orthodontist Atlanta GA

How to Properly Brush Your Teeth

How to Properly Brush Your Teeth

Good oral hygiene is not just for a whiter smile and fresher breath, it’s important for your overall health.[1]  Brushing your teeth removes plaque—a thin film of bacteria that sticks to your teeth and will cause cavities, gum disease, and if you ignore it long enough, will cause your teeth to fall out! Bad breath affects how people want to be near us.[2] You know why to brush, but if you would like to learn how to brush your teeth effectively, these suggestions will help.

Use A Good Toothbrush

Choose a toothbrush with soft nylon bristles. This will effectively remove plaque and debris from your teeth, without irritating the gums or eroding tooth enamel like hard bristled brushes can do when used with sideways action. The toothbrush should also fit comfortably in your hand, and have a head small enough to easily reach all of your teeth, especially the ones at the back. If you have difficulty fitting the toothbrush into your mouth, it is probably too big.[3]

  • Electric toothbrushes are a great choice. However, you can do a good job with a manual toothbrush — it’s all in the technique.
  • You should definitely avoid toothbrushes with “natural” bristles made from animal hair as these can harbor bacteria and are hard.

 

Replace Your Toothbrush Regularly

The bristles will wear out over time, losing their flexibility and effectiveness. You should purchase a new toothbrush every year, or as soon as the bristles start to splay out and lose their shape. Visual inspection of the toothbrush is more important than the actual timeline.

  • Researchers have established that thousands of microbes grow on toothbrush bristles and handles if stored improperly.[4]
  • Always rinse your brush after using it, and store it upright and uncovered so that it can dry before your next use. Otherwise bacteria will grow.[5]

 

Use A Fluoride Toothpaste

It not only helps remove plaque, it also helps strengthen tooth enamel.[6] However, it’s important to note that fluoride toothpaste is not to be swallowed. It should not be used for children under the age of 3.[7]

You can get toothpastes to target a wide variety of dental and gum problems, including cavities, tartar, sensitive teeth and gums, gingivitis and stained teeth. Choose the one that suits your best or ask your dentist or hygienist for advice.[8]

 

Use A Small Amount Of Toothpaste

Squeeze only a pea-sized amount of toothpaste onto your toothbrush. Applying too much toothpaste can cause to much foam to form, tempting you to spit and finish too early. Plus, it increases the risk of you ingesting more fluoride-filled toothpaste. [9]

TOOTHPASTEAMOUNT

  • If brushing is painful, try brushing more gently with accurate up/down motion only or switch to a toothpaste formulated for sensitive teeth.
  • Set your bristles at the gum line at a 45-degree angle. Gently brush with a short, vertical or circular motion. Bite your teeth together as you brush and brush the gum line. Don’t brush across your teeth.[10]
  • Spend three minutes brushing. Brushing just a few teeth at a time, work your way around your mouth in a cycle (start outside lower left round to outside lower right then outside upper right to upper left, change to inside uppers before inside upper right ,inside lower right, finally inside lower left). Be sure that you get every tooth, spending about 10 seconds in each spot. If it helps, you can divide your mouth into quadrants: top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right.
  • If you get bored, try brushing your teeth while watching television or hum a song to yourself while you brush. Brushing your teeth for the duration of an entire song will ensure that you brush thoroughly!

 

Brush Your Molars

Position the toothbrush so that the bristles are resting on top of your bottom molars. Work the toothbrush in an in-and-out motion, and move from the back of your mouth to the front. Repeat on the other side of your mouth. When the bottom teeth are clean, flip the toothbrush over and work on the top molars. To access outside top molars always swing the lower jaw to the side you are working on. This will increase the space available to move your brush up and down by several times so that no sideways motion occurs .

 

Brush The Inner Surfaces Of Your Teeth

Tip the toothbrush so that the head of the toothbrush is pointing towards your gum line, and brush each tooth. Dentists report that the most commonly skipped area is the inside of the lower front teeth, so be sure not to forget those or other areas hard to reach![11]

 

Gently Brush Your Tongue

After you’ve cleaned your teeth, use the bristles of your toothbrush to gently clean your tongue. (Don’t press too hard, or you’ll damage the tissue.) This helps keep bad breath away and gets rid of bacteria on your tongue.

 

Rinse Out Your Mouth

If you choose to rinse after brushing, take a sip of water. Swish it around your mouth, and spit it out.

  • Note that there is some debate on whether or not this is recommended. While some feel that it reduces the efficacy of the topical fluoride treatment, others wish to ensure that no fluoride is ingested. There are also those who just don’t like having toothpaste in their mouths! If you’re at a high risk of getting cavities, it may be beneficial not to rinse, or rinse with just a small amount of water—effectively creating a fluoride mouthwash.[12]
  • Other studies have shown that rinsing after brushing has no significant impact on the effectiveness of brushing with a fluoride toothpaste.[13]

 

Rinse Your Toothbrush

Hold your toothbrush under running water for a few seconds to remove any bacteria from the brush. If you don’t rinse the toothbrush properly, you can actually introduce old bacteria into your mouth the next time you use it. Rinsing also removes any leftover toothpaste. Place your toothbrush somewhere where it will easily dry out.

Finish with a fluoride-based mouthwash (Optional). Take a small sip of mouthwash, swish it in your mouth for about 30 seconds, and spit it out. Be careful not to swallow any.

 

Remember to brush at least twice a day. Most dentists recommend that you brush at least twice a day — once in the morning and once before bed (this is the most important time to brush). If you can fit in a third time somewhere in the middle, even better!   Remember to brush at a 45° angle as this helps remove plaque and food/drink particles on your teeth better than if you did it normally. You should also try to avoid snacking on sticky candy between meals as much as possible, as this results in more food debris and bacteria building up in the mouth.

 

 

 

References

  1. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20100527/brushing-teeth-may-keep-heart-disease-away
  2. http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=b&iid=291&aid=1134
  3. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes
  4. http://www.adha.org/oralhealth/brushing.htm
  5. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00003
  6. http://www.ada.org/1322.aspx
  7. http://www.fluoridealert.org/issues/dental-products/toothpastes/
  8. http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Oral-Hygiene/Brushing-and-Flossing/article/How-to-Brush.cvsp
  9. http://blog.juliegillisdds.com/?p=47
  10. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes?page=2
  11. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes?page=2
  12. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8281561
  13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12399689
  14. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/brushing-your-teeth/AN02098
  15. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes?page=1

 

 

 

IS FLUORIDE DANGEROUS?

IS FLUORIDE DANGEROUS?

What is Fluoride?

Fluoride is a natural mineral found throughout the earth’s crust and widely distributed in nature. Some foods and water supplies contain fluoride.

Fluoride is often added to drinking water and provided through  toothpaste.  Fluoride  varnishes are also  applied by dental professionals to reduce tooth decay.  In the 1930s, researchers found that people who grew up drinking naturally fluoridated water had up to two-thirds fewer cavities than people living in areas without fluoridated water. Studies since then have repeatedly shown that when fluoride is added to a community’s water supply, tooth decay decreases.

How Does Fluoride Work?

Fluoride helps prevent cavities in two different ways:

  • Fluoride concentrates in the growing bones and developing teeth of children, helping to harden the enamel on baby and adult teeth before they emerge.
  • Fluoride helps to harden the enamel on adult teeth that have already emerged.

Fluoride works during the demineralization and remineralization processes that naturally occur in your mouth.

  • After you eat, your saliva contains acids that cause demineralization -a dissolving of the calcium and phosphorous under the tooth’s surface.
  • At other times when your saliva is less acidic it does just the opposite- replenishing the calcium and phosphorous that keep your teeth hard. This process is called remineralization. When fluoride is present during remineralization, the minerals deposited are harder than they would otherwise be, helping to strengthen your teeth and prevent dissolution during the next demineralization phase.

Invisalign patients can also use their Invisalign Aligners with over the counter Fluoride rises to increase the effectiveness of the fluoride rinse by pouring it into the trays!

Fluoride is not only safe, but it is effective and necessary — that’s the conclusion of every major health organization in America. Critics of fluoridation disagree with that conclusion. Let’s examine these claims and look at the evidence.

Claim #1: “Fluoride causes cancer.”

  • In 2011, a U.S. study found no link between fluoride and bone cancer. The design of this study was approved by the National Cancer Institute1. The study is considered very reliable because—unlike previous studies—it examined actual fluoride levels in bone.
  • In October 2011, after lengthy review, a committee of California’s Office of Environment Health Hazard Assessment voted unanimously that the evidence did not support classifying fluoride as a cancer-causing substance.

Claim #2: “Fluoridation is harmful because it causes a condition called fluorosis.”

The Facts:

  • Dental fluorosis is a change in the appearance of the tooth’s enamel surface. Nearly all fluorosis in the U.S. is mild, leaving faint white marking on teeth. It does not cause pain, and it does not affect the health or function of the teeth. It’s so subtle that only a dental professional can correctly identify it.
  • Dental fluorosis occurs among some people in all communities, even those that do not fluoridate their local water systems. For example, fluorosis occurs in countries like Norway, which does not fluoridate its public water systems because it occurs naturally.
  • Fluorosis results from increased consumption of fluoride, over an extended period of time, while the teeth are developing under the gums. One source is toothpaste, which contains a much higher concentration of fluoride than optimally fluoridated water2. This is why parents of children under the age of 6 are advised to supervise their kids’ tooth-brushing and apply the age-a small smear of toothpaste to the toothbrush.
  • A study published in 2010 found that mild fluorosis was not an adverse health condition and that it might even have “favorable” effects on overall health. That’s why the study’s authors said there was no reason why parents should be advised not to use fluoridated water in infant formula.

Claim #3: “Fluoride must pose a danger because there’s a warning label on toothpaste.”

Anti-fluoride groups claim that the existence of this label, required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), demonstrates that fluoride poses a danger. But here are the facts:

The Facts:

  • In 1996, the ADA reviewed studies and concluded that “a child could not absorb enough fluoride from toothpaste to cause a serious problem” and added that fluoride toothpaste3 has an “excellent safety record.” The American Dental Association (ADA) believes the warning label on toothpaste exaggerates the potential for negative health effects from swallowing toothpaste.
  • Every day, millions of Americans use fluoride toothpaste without any negative effect. The warning label simply reflects the fact that:
    • The concentration of fluoride in toothpaste is much higher than that of fluoridated water.
    • Parents are advised to supervise children’s tooth brushing to prevent swallowing because consumption of more concentrated forms of fluoride when children are young and their teeth are forming can lead to fluorosis.

Claim #4: “Europe doesn’t engage in fluoridation, so why should we?”

For a variety of reasons, European countries employ a number of different means to provide fluoride to their citizens:

The Facts:

  • Salt fluoridation is widely used in Europe, and milk fluoridation is used in several countries. In fact, more than 70 million Europeans consume fluoridated salt or milk. Fluoridated salt reaches most of the population in Germany and Switzerland. These two countries have among the lowest rates of tooth decay in all of Europe.
  • Fluoridated water is provided to 12 million Europeans, mostly reaching residents of Great Britain, Ireland, Spain and other countries.
  • Italy has not tried to create a national system of water fluoridation, for two reasons. First, the drinking of bottled water is well established in Italian culture. Second, a number of areas in Italy have water supplies with natural fluoride levels that already reach the optimal level to prevent decay.
  • Technical challenges are a major reason why fluoridated water isn’t common in Europe. In France and Switzerland, water fluoridation is logistically difficult because there are tens of thousands of separate sources for drinking water. This is why these countries use salt fluoridation, fluoride-rinse programs and other ways to get fluoride to their people.

Claim #5: “Fluoride is a by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry.”

Opponents use this misleading message to associate fluoride with fertilizer and industrial waste.

The Facts:

  • Fluoride is extracted from phosphate rock, and so is phosphoric acid—an ingredient in Coke and Pepsi. Neither one of them comes from fertilizer.
  • Fluoride is extracted from the same phosphate rock that is also used to create fertilizers that will enrich soil.
  • The quality and safety of fluoride additives are ensured by Standard 60, a program commissioned by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Standard 60 is a set of standards created and monitored by an independent committee of health experts. This committee provides regular reports to the EPA. More than 80 percent of fluoride additives are produced by U.S. companies, but no matter where they come from, Standard 60 uses on-site inspections and even surprise “spot checks” to confirm the additives meet quality and safety standards.

Claim #6: “The National Research Council said that fluoride can have harmful effects.”

Opponents point to the NRC’s 2006 report on fluoride as a reason to question water fluoridation, but that misrepresents the purpose of this report.

The Facts:

  • The NRC raised the possibility of health concerns in U.S. communities where the natural fluoride levels in well water or aquifers are unusually high. These natural fluoride levels are dramatically higher than the level used to fluoridate public water systems
  • The NRC states that its report was not an evaluation of water fluoridation. “…it is important to note that the safety and effectiveness of the practice of water fluoridation was outside the scope of this report and is not evaluated.”
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wrote that the NRC’s findings “are consistent with CDC’s assessment that water is safe and healthy at the levels” used for water fluoridation.

Claim #7: “There are highly fluoridated states that have higher decay rates than states where fluoridation is less common.”

It is erroneous to compare fluoridation and tooth decay rates from state to state as proof that fluoridation does not reduce tooth decay.

The Facts:

  • Water fluoridation is one important way to prevent tooth decay, but even where it is present, many other factors contribute to rates of decay. For example, research confirms that low-income people are more at risk for decay than upper income Americans. This makes sense because income status shapes how often a person visits a dentist, their diet and nutrition, and other confounding factors.
  • Comparing different states based solely on fluoridation rates ignores these key income differences. For example, West Virginia and Connecticut reach roughly the same percentage of their residents with fluoridated water—91 percent and 90 percent, respectively. Yet the percentage of West Virginians living below the poverty line is nearly double the percentage of those living in Connecticut.
  • A more reliable comparison would examine decay-related problems of people in the same state and income group. A 2010 New York study did precisely this—comparing Medicaid enrollees in counties where fluoridation was prevalent to enrollees in counties where most communities were not fluoridated. The study found that residents of counties where fluoridated water was rare needed 33 percent more fillings, root canals and extractions than those in counties where fluoridated water was common.

Claim #8: “A Harvard study shows that fluoride and lower IQ scores.”

Claims have been made about fluoride and IQ scores. They are not based on sound science but on flawed studies conducted outside the U.S.

The Facts:

  • The “Harvard study” was a review of previous studies on IQ scores for children living in areas of China, Mongolia and Iran where the water supplies have very high levels of natural fluoride. In many cases, these areas had significantly higher levels than those used to fluoridate public water systems in the U.S. — more than 10 times as much as the optimal level used in the U.S.
  • The Harvard researchers who reviewed these studies were quoted as saying, “While the studies the Harvard team reviewed did indicate that very high levels of fluoride could be linked to lower IQs among schoolchildren, the data is not particularly applicable here because it came from foreign sources where fluoride levels are multiple times higher than they are in American tap water.
  • The studies that were reviewed were observational in nature, were conducted over several decades, and did not account for confounding factors, Neither these studies nor the Harvard analysis can conclude a cause for the change in IQ scores that was observed.
  • Between the 1940s and the 1990s, the average IQ scores of Americans improved 15 points. This gain — about 3 IQ points per decade — came during the very period when fluoridation steadily grew to serve millions and millions of additional Americans.
  • British researchers who evaluated similar fluoride-IQ studies found “basic errors” and wrote that different data were combined in a way “that does not give a valid or meaningful result.
  • For additional information, visit Fluoride and IQs4.

Claim #9: “The government has never conducted a randomized, control study of fluoridation.”

The Facts:

  • Numerous clinical studies have proven that fluoridated water protects teeth. Since 2010, studies from Nevada, New York, and Alaska have added to the overwhelming evidence that fluoridated water protects teeth from decay. In 2014, separate studies from New Zealand and Great Britain have added to this body of knowledge.
  • A randomized study for fluoridation would require a community to be divided into two groups, where some homes would receive fluoridated water and the others would not. It is logistically unfeasible, if not impossible, to pipe fluoridated water into some homes and not others. That is why we rely on the body of evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of fluoride, such as those above, and on the randomized clinical trials of toothpaste, tablets and varnish.

Claim #10: “Fluoride can harm plants and animals that live in the wild.”

The Facts:

  • The fluoride level in a fluoridated water system is not high enough to harm plant or animal species. And research shows that even high levels of fluoride do not have a toxic effect on plants in ponds.
  • The average fluoride level in ocean water is 1.4 milligrams per liter, which is significantly higher than the level used to fluoridate public water systems. No reputable source has identified any negative effects on salmon or other fish that live in the ocean.
  • An environmental analyst who reviewed a 1989 study about the spawning habits of salmon criticized its authors for failing to “cite any research at all to substantiate their speculation.” This study failed to rule out the presence of other factors, such as the water turbidity and water velocity near dams.

Claim #11: “Fluoridating water is ‘medicating’ people without their approval.”

The Facts:

  • Fluoride is a nutrient, not a medicine. Medicine is used to cure or control a medical problem that has already been diagnosed, such as hay fever or high blood pressure. Fluoridated water is not a cure; it’s a proven way to prevent a medical problem: tooth decay.
  • Fortifying drinking water with fluoride is a lot like fortifying milk with Vitamin D. These additives prevent poor health. America has a history of fortifying foods or beverages to strengthen health—for example, adding iodine to table salt, fortifying milk with Vitamin D, and adding folic acid to breads and cereals.

Sources:

1: http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths/fluoridated-water-fact-sheet

2: http://ilikemyteeth.org/fluoridation/

3: http://ilikemyteeth.org/fluoridation/fluoride-toothpaste/

4: http://ilikemyteeth.org/fluoridation/dangers-of-fluoride/fluoride-iqs/

Oral Hygiene For The Orthodontic Patient

Oral Hygiene For The Orthodontic Patient

When you have braces on teeth, those teeth need extra attention to protect them from decay, staining and gum disease. You should also take precautions to avoid damaging the braces. For example, activities to avoid include eating chewy or sticky sweets, eating hard or crunchy foods, biting your lip, breathing excessively through your mouth and pushing your tongue against your teeth.

Brushing

Although brushing twice a day is the standard oral care recommendation, when you wear braces, you should brush after every time you eat — even after that mid-afternoon vending machine snack or some late-night munchies. That’s because food particles easily become trapped in the braces, and the longer those particles stay trapped, the greater risk you have of developing dental problems. Use a soft toothbrush , or an electric toothbrush if you prefer.

Start by rinsing your mouth with water to loosen food stuck in and around your braces. It’s important to brush each tooth at the gum line and both above and below the brackets. Brush your gum line first, holding the toothbrush at a 45-degree angle. Next, clean the brackets by brushing at a downward angle on top of the brackets and brushing at an upward angle at the bottom of the brackets. Rinse again after brushing.

Other Cleaning Methods

Floss at least once a day, making sure you floss not only between the braces but also under the wires. To more easily floss under the wires, use a floss threader or orthodontic flosser, which you can buy at drug stores. Waxed floss is easier to slide between your teeth and less likely to snag on your braces than unwaxed floss.

If you have space between your teeth, you might find that an interproximal (also called interdental) brush that goes between the teeth works better than flossing. Another option for hard-to-reach areas is an oral irrigator. Its stream of pulsating water can remove plaque and food debris.

Watch What You Eat

When you wear braces, you need to be more aware of what you eat. Eating too many sugary and starchy foods can cause plaque to build up around the brackets, which can cause staining of the teeth, causing cavities or leading to gum disease. You should especially avoid sticky and chewy foods, such as dried fruits, caramel, taffy, corn on the cob and chewing gum, all of which can become stuck and be hard to remove from braces.

Hard foods are another no-no. Foods such as nuts, ice, popcorn and beef jerky can break the wires of the braces and loosen the brackets. Even otherwise healthy foods, such as raw apples and carrots, can be problematic because their hard texture can damage the wires. To eat crunchy foods, cut them into small, bite-size pieces.

Invisalign

Invisalign offers a number of benefits over traditional orthodontics. Patients love that they are unnoticeable, comfortable and removable. Unlike metal braces, Invisalign wearers are not presented with extra challenges when brushing and flossing. This is a remarkable advantage towards the health of your smile during orthodontic treatment. However, it doesn’t mean that you get a free pass to neglect the health of your teeth and gums all together.

 

Although Invisalign trays can be removed for brushing, there are still some things to watch out for. The most significant step you can take towards a healthier smile while wearing Invisalign is to taking diligent care of your aligner trays as well as your teeth.

 

West Paces Ferry Orthodontics patients usually wear trays for a week each. That may not seem like a long time, but it is plenty of time for bacteria to harbor inside your trays, especially if your tray gets scratched. Your trays can also seal food particles into your teeth that you may have missed with brushing and flossing. This creates a welcoming environment for tooth decay and even gum disease.

 

During Invisalign therapy, you can expect to wear your trays about 22 hours per day. Therefore, follow these care tips to ensure your smile stays healthy while it gets straighter:

  • Use a soft-bristle toothbrush to daily clean your trays
  • Store your trays in their case when they’re not in your mouth
  • Always brush, floss, and rinse your teeth immediately before putting trays back in
  • Don’t let trays get dry for long periods of time
  • Avoid smoking while undergoing Invisalign treatment

Additional Tips

If you are caught without a toothbrush, vigorously rinse your mouth with water (or mouthwash) and brush as soon as possible. Also, if your braces or wires chafe the inside of your lips, you can place a special wax on them to prevent this from happening and rinse often with salt-water. You can get this wax at drug stores, or just ask your dentist or orthodontist.